There was a time, not too long ago, when the “classics” (Greek myth, etc.) were the foundation of a well-rounded education. This included reading Greek and Latin, as well as translating and writing both languages. And while our current education levels have fallen far by comparison, it is never too late to read, minimally, Greek myth. There is something universal about these ancient tales and they offer something more each time you read them. The texts travel forward to us from a time when culture was closely bound to Nature. And this alone seems to imbue the myths with the patina of truth. Additionally, it often feels as if every possible human experience, good, bad, happy or sad, has been allegorized for all time in living color – so to speak. The use of language, description and phrasing, in well translated myth, gives one the sense of a higher-minded era driven by codes of conduct and a moral compass pointed north. There is also a palpable sense of demise when the needle of that compass drifts south during a given narrative. In our era such lessons are sorely needed. In our time the compass needle is fixed south, and codes of conduct nearly extinct. What is more is that there are many levels of meaning in classic myth. One can find the seasons, the Skyclock, spiritual matters, conduct and much more. Underneath it all there seems to be truth, or maybe even a path common to all of us by virtue of being alive. There is something more in myth and it feels beyond question. And this essence that remains beyond question appears to be universal in all myths of value, regardless of culture or time. And while the mythical names and costumes and appearances change, the underlying value remains for all by dint of having been born alive. In this episode I offer what I can as one who is self-taught across many cultures, with regard to myth. What I consider today will not be what I consider tomorrow, as these texts from antiquity should be read and reread. Lastly, it is my hope that young and old alike will have the opportunity to delve into these timeless allegories about what it means to be alive and surrounded by aspects of nature. Though in contrast, in our time, the counterfeit shadow of technology seeks to displace us all from the Creation. And yet the “classics” still remain, as does their foundation… Nature.

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